Where I’m Coming From is a month-long digital programme dedicated to languages that are present and spoken by migrant communities in the UK. The programme aims to open up conversations around the exclusivity of language in accessing the production and consumption of arts and culture, alongside considering the wider cultural presence of underrepresented artists and groups in international art debates. It challenges the assumed position of the English language and its hegemonic stature as a given and universal form of communication. In doing so, Where I’m Coming from highlights the beauty, intricacies and complexities of a multitude of languages featured through the project. 

Where I’m Coming From orients towards increasing opportunities for new ways of working collaboratively, rethinking the impact and role of arts and culture in a pandemic and post-pandemic scenario. It emphasises with careful thought the vested importance of highlighting diversity and pluralism in such unique times. At the same time, the programme endeavours to experiment with various models to mediate the digital experience and proximity. 

Where I’m Coming From strives to connect and work with community groups in the UK and internationally by inviting them to lead cooking sessions. Through this, the programme invites the public to learn about each cultural group’s cuisine, which also allows them to reproduce and engage in their own homes.

Rhine Benardino

(Curator)

Linda Rocco

(Curator)

Design and Built by Sujai | All Rights Reserved _inventory Platform

Where I’m Coming From is a month-long digital programme dedicated to languages that are present and spoken by migrant communities in the UK. The programme aims to open up conversations around the exclusivity of language in accessing the production and consumption of arts and culture, alongside considering the wider cultural presence of underrepresented artists and groups in international art debates. It challenges the assumed position of the English language and its hegemonic stature as a given and universal form of communication. In doing so, Where I’m Coming from highlights the beauty, intricacies and complexities of a multitude of languages featured through the project. 

Where I’m Coming From orients towards increasing opportunities for new ways of working collaboratively, rethinking the impact and role of arts and culture in a pandemic and post-pandemic scenario. It emphasises with careful thought the vested importance of highlighting diversity and pluralism in such unique times. At the same time, the programme endeavours to experiment with various models to mediate the digital experience and proximity. 

Where I’m Coming From strives to connect and work with community groups in the UK and internationally by inviting them to lead cooking sessions. Through this, the programme invites the public to learn about each cultural group’s cuisine, which also allows them to reproduce and engage in their own homes.

Rhine Benardino

(Curator)

Linda Rocco

(Curator)

Design and Built by Sujai | All Rights Reserved _inventory Platform

Rhine Bernardino is an artist, independent curator and researcher. They hold a Bachelors Degree in Film and Audio Visual Communication at the University of the Philippines (Diliman) and an MA Fine Art degree (Sculpture) from the Royal College of Art. They were awarded the highly-regarded Abraaj-RCA Innovation Scholarship and they received a Distinction for their MA dissertation on exploring possibili- ties of contemporary art practice in the rural context and communities vis-à-vis urban practices. Rhine has curated and exhibited their artwork internationally especially in Europe and Asia including public commissions such as Nine Elms on the South Bank in London. Rhine has been invited to take part in several international art residencies and programmes most recently as part of the Australia Arts Council’s Future Leaders Programme and Office of Contemporary Art (OCA) Norway’s International Visi- tor’s Programme. They have been doing an extensive field research and mapping of art collectives, al- ternative spaces and community-based projects across the globe. In building on this work, they have been looking at a myriad of possibilities of working with communities through art practice in driving so- cietal change and aiding in highlighting the marginalised voices of communities and societies. This re- search has various aspects that percolate through different branches and manifestations, such as the realisation of an online mapping interface of projects and undertakings across the globe—which will be open sourced, multi-authored and accessible online. One primary focus is investigating art practice and activism in strengthening and deepening cultural identity in indigenous communities. They further extend their art practice through _inventory, a collaboration-based platform that inter- venes in alternative and public spaces, focusing on community-based practices, from public perfor- mances to events and discussions in urban and rural contexts. _inventory puts strong emphasis in working collaboratively with artists and communities, promoting the idea that art should be non-exclu- sive, educational, sustainable and expand not just ways of problem solving but also ways of thinking critically and looking beyond traditional solutions.

Linda Rocco is a London-based contemporary art curator and PhD researcher at the Royal College of Art with a full LAHP/AHRC doctoral award. She is creative consultant for Liberty at The Greater London
Authority (GLA) and has curated public events and exhibitions internationally, with established
small-scale institutions as Delfina Foundation, to warehouse spaces as Yinka Shonibare’s Guest Proj- ects, including the curation of the public sphere for Nine Elms on the South Bank. Linda is the
co-founder and director of ‘I’m Here, Where Are You?’ a disability festival and engagement programme
co-produced with Cambridge Junction.
Linda also co-directs the not-for-profit organisation _inventory platform, which engages communities
in urban and rural contexts through socially engaged art projects since 2016.
Linda regularly works as curator for artists and private galleries, as well as consulting for charities,
foundations and public institutions on accessible and socially engaged arts; collaboration with STEM
subjects as well as participatory and intermedia practices. Her research interests orbit around alterna- tive organisational methodologies which recognise pluralistic values and experiences in cooperative
and distributed ways; long-term cultural engagement and networks creation; blockchain and crypto
ecosystems; transdisciplinary experimentation.
Recent collaborations include: Goethe Institute London, Danish Art Foundation, Ministry of Culture
Taiwan, Pineapple Lab. – Philippines, Yinka Shonibare Foundation, Frieze Art Fair London, Cambridge
Junction, Unlimited, UK Antarctic Heritage Trust, Mansions of the Future, Laure Genillard Gallery –
London, The Genesis Foundation.

Rhine Bernardino is an artist, independent curator and researcher. They hold a Bachelors Degree in Film and Audio Visual Communication at the University of the Philippines (Diliman) and an MA Fine Art degree (Sculpture) from the Royal College of Art. They were awarded the highly-regarded Abraaj-RCA Innovation Scholarship and they received a Distinction for their MA dissertation on exploring possibilities of contemporary art practice in the rural context and communities vis-à-vis urban practices.

Rhine has curated and exhibited their artwork internationally especially in Europe and Asia including public commissions such as Nine Elms on the South Bank in London. Rhine has been invited to take part in several international art residencies and programmes most recently as part of the Australia Arts Council’s Future Leaders Programme and Office of Contemporary Art (OCA) Norway’s International Visitor’s Programme. They have been doing an extensive field research and mapping of art collectives, alternative spaces and community-based projects across the globe. In building on this work, they have been looking at a myriad of possibilities of working with communities through art practice in driving societal change and aiding in highlighting the marginalised voices of communities and societies. This research has various aspects that percolate through different branches and manifestations, such as the realisation of an online mapping interface of projects and undertakings across the globe—which will be open sourced, multi-authored and accessible online. One primary focus is investigating art practice and activism in strengthening and deepening cultural identity in indigenous communities.

They further extend their art practice through _inventory, a collaboration-based platform that intervenes in alternative and public spaces, focusing on community-based practices, from public performances to events and discussions in urban and rural contexts. _inventory puts strong emphasis in working collaboratively with artists and communities, promoting the idea that art should be non-exclusive, educational, sustainable and expand not just ways of problem solving but also ways of thinking critically and looking beyond traditional solutions.

Linda Rocco is a London-based contemporary art curator and PhD researcher at the Royal College of Art with a full LAHP/AHRC doctoral award. She is creative consultant for Liberty at The Greater London Authority (GLA) and has curated public events and exhibitions internationally, with established small-scale institutions as Delfina Foundation, to warehouse spaces as Yinka Shonibare’s Guest Proj- ects, including the curation of the public sphere for Nine Elms on the South Bank. Linda is the co-founder and director of ‘I’m Here, Where Are You?’ a disability festival and engagement programme co-produced with Cambridge Junction.

Linda also co-directs the not-for-profit organisation _inventory platform, which engages communities in urban and rural contexts through socially engaged art projects since 2016.

Linda regularly works as curator for artists and private galleries, as well as consulting for charities, foundations and public institutions on accessible and socially engaged arts; collaboration with STEM subjects as well as participatory and intermedia practices. Her research interests orbit around alterna- tive organisational methodologies which recognise pluralistic values and experiences in cooperative and distributed ways; long-term cultural engagement and networks creation; blockchain and crypto ecosystems; transdisciplinary experimentation.

Recent collaborations include: Goethe Institute London, Danish Art Foundation, Ministry of Culture Taiwan, Pineapple Lab. – Philippines, Yinka Shonibare Foundation, Frieze Art Fair London, Cambridge Junction, Unlimited, UK Antarctic Heritage Trust, Mansions of the Future, Laure Genillard Gallery – London, The Genesis Foundation.